top of page

My inspiration for this project was influenced by the video games I played when I grew up.  In the early 2000’s, video game graphics had a certain jerky and quirky movement that was sudden and ‘playful.’ Drawing on the way early Mario Bros. games looked like, I decided to use random little characters that had a ‘childish’ and ‘cartoon-like’ appearance.

 

Like in most games, the beginning opens up with an introduction that has a ‘story’ introduced to the player. Once the introduction passes, the game begins, where anything random can happen, as the player can make different decisions. Using these characters, I wanted to create a video that would start out with a storyline and move on to a more randomized effect.

 

My next step was to find a song I thought would fit the theme. I found a musical piece titled, Good Fellow, by Komiku, on a free music download website. The song sounds like an old video game from the late 1900’s, early 2000’s, and seemed perfect for my video. Having all the elements needed to make the piece, I uploaded the song to my work, watched the waveforms of the music and made the subjects in the frames react to the music.

Move_001_01_0021 copy copy
Move_001_01_0023 copy copy
Move_001_01_0025 copy copy
Move_001_01_0151 copy copy
Move_001_01_0153 copy copy
Move_001_01_0155 copy copy
Move_001_01_1007 copy copy
Move_001_01_1011 copy copy
Move_001_01_1009 copy

The Process

Making this video was a fun and enjoyable experience. I enjoyed making this video the most because I feel that it has the most liberty on how creative you can become, especially since you can apply effects onto the live footage shot. The process to making this started with finding a song that fit the style and idea I wanted to use.

 

After finding the song I wanted, I needed to find what objects I wanted to use in my videos, and what composition background I wanted to use. Following this, I made style frames and thumbnails of what I had an idea of doing. I then uploaded the song to the program I was using, Dragonframe, and and looked at all the waveforms of the song.

 

Spotting where the song was upbeat, having higher and tighter waveforms, and where the song was quieter and slowed down, having smaller and spaced waveforms, I took shots of my objects two frames at a time, reviewing the movements they had in relation to the music. I made sure that the movement was precise to the music, and if any problems occurred, I would delete a few frames and reshoot them. After I was satisfied with all my shots, I finished the length of time I wanted my video to be, I exported my footage as a video and all the individual images, so that I could reshoot or add to the video any time I wanted.

A Day in the Life of a Tusken Raider

bottom of page